Resource data and groups as of August 2018

Resource maps intended to help those seeking support resources in their community. You may want to know that we do not endorse or directly support any presented resource. Those seeking programs, services, or treatment are urged to verify each provider’s credentials and certifications to confirm their expertise and quality of service. 

In an on-going effort to verify resource data, the administrative Data Team cross-references a number of public data sources and collaborates with a variety of institutions and organizations within the field. Where able, resources are assigned to a Group to help users better understand the nature and reliability of those resources. 

Where indicated, leading authorities in the field have been recruited as Data Partners to assist in managing specific data sets. This may involve directly supplying data that has been certified or having the partner review specific resources that are submitted for publication by the general public.

Resource data groups

A.A, Alcoholics Anonymous— Alcoholics Anonymous is an international fellowship of men and women who have had a drinking problem. It is nonprofessional, self-supporting, multiracial, apolitical, and available almost everywhere. There are no age or education requirements. Membership is open to anyone who wants to do something about his or her drinking problem.

  • A.A. meetings that appear in applications with data services from Capacitype have been submitted by the general public and are tagged for search purposes.

Al-Anon Family Groups— Al‑Anon is a mutual support program for people whose lives have been affected by someone else’s drinking. By sharing common experiences and applying the Al-Anon principles, families and friends of alcoholics can bring positive changes to their individual situations, whether or not the alcoholic admits the existence of a drinking problem or seeks help. Alateen, a part of the Al-Anon Family Groups, is a fellowship of young people (mostly teenagers) whose lives have been affected by someone else’s drinking whether they are in your life drinking or not. By attending Alateen, teenagers meet other teenagers with similar situations. Alateen is not a religious program and there are no fees or dues to belong to it.

  • Al-Anon/Alateen meetings that appear in applications with data services from Capacitype originate from national meeting finder and organizational websites that intend to help individuals and families find appropriate recovery support and mutual aid group options in their communities.

ARCO, Association of Recovery Community Organizations—Faces & Voices’ Association of Recovery Community Organizations unites and supports the growing network of local, regional, and statewide recovery community organizations (RCOs). ARCO links RCOs and their leaders with local and national allies and provides training and technical assistance to groups. ARCO helps build the unified voice of the organized recovery community and fulfill their commitment to supporting the development of new groups and strengthening existing ones.

  • ARCO members that appear in applications with data services from Capacitype have been submitted by the general public, indicate membership on their public website, and are tagged for search purposes. 

ARHE, Association of Recovery in Higher Education—The Association of Recovery in Higher Education represents collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) and collegiate recovery communities (CRCs), the faculty and staff who support them, and the students who represent them. ARHE provides the education, resources, and community connection needed to help change the trajectory of recovering student’s lives.

ARS, Association of Recovery Schools—The Association of Recovery Schools assists in the creation, development, maintenance, and growth of recovery schools across the U.S.

  • Recovery high schools in the U.S. have been reported and tracked by Capacitype since initiation of the 2013 Market Study on Recovery Schools. All classified recovery high schools are verified by the Association of Recovery Schools (ARS) in accordance with established definitions for school-based recovery support services. Those recovery high schools that are accredited by ARS receive an additional designation. Data set last updated on May 8, 2017.

ASAM, American Society of Addiction Medicine—ASAM, founded in 1954, is a professional society representing over 4,000 physicians, clinicians, and associated professionals in the field of addiction medicine. ASAM is dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians and the public, supporting research and prevention, and promoting the appropriate role of physicians in the care of patients with addiction.

  • In 2018, the database will expand to include doctors, nurses, and other medical professionals who are certified addiction specialists certified by the American Board of Addiction Medicine and/or a psychiatrist certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.

CARF, Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities—CARF provides accreditation services worldwide at the request of health and human service providers. Whether seeking rehabilitation for a disability, treatment for addiction and substance abuse, home and community services, retirement living, or other health and human services, CARF accreditation signals providers that meet specified standards and have demonstrated their commitment to service excellence.

  • In an effort to better assist people in finding and accessing quality treatment care, the data set of treatment resources has been reviewed by the Data Team for accuracy of contact information and self-reporting of Licenses, Certifications, and Accreditations (LCAs). Where applicable, treatment resources that have completed CARF accreditation are indicated. You can learn more about treatment resource verification by selecting this help page. 

CASEL, Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning—The Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning is the world’s leading organization advancing one of the most important fields in education in decades: the practice of promoting integrated academic, social, and emotional learning for all children in preschool through high school.

  • In 2018, the database will expand to include prevention efforts at the districts with whom CASEL has partnered through the Collaborating Districts Initiative.

Celebrate Recovery— Celebrate Recovery is a Christ-centered, 12 step recovery program for anyone struggling with hurt, pain or addiction of any kind. Celebrate Recovery is a safe place to find community and freedom from the issues that are controlling our life.

  • Celebrate Recovery meetings that appear in applications with data services from Capacitype originate from national meeting finder and organizational websites that intend to help individuals and families find appropriate recovery support and mutual aid group options in their communities.

Co-Dependents Anonymous— Co-Dependents Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women whose common purpose is to develop healthy relationships. The only requirement for membership is a desire for healthy and loving relationships.

  • CoDA meetings that appear in applications with data services from Capacitype originate from national meeting finder and organizational websites that intend to help individuals and families find appropriate recovery support and mutual aid group options in their communities.

COA, Council on Accreditation—The Council on Accreditation accredits the full continuum of child welfare, behavioral health, and community-based social services. The organization currently accredits more than 2,200 organizations and programs serving more than 7 million individuals and families. COA has separate Accreditation Programs for private organizations, public agencies, Canadian organizations, military family readiness programs, child and youth development programs, and international adoption programs.

  • In an effort to better assist people in finding and accessing quality treatment care, the data set of treatment resources has been reviewed by the Data Team for accuracy of contact information and self-reporting of Licenses, Certifications, and Accreditations (LCAs). Where applicable, treatment resources that have completed COA accreditation are indicated. You can learn more about treatment resource verification by selecting this help page

Conrad N. Hilton Foundation Grantee—The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation is a family foundation established in 1944 by the man who started Hilton Hotels. The Foundation provides funds to nonprofit organizations working to improve the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people throughout the world.  Youth and young adults are especially vulnerable to developing substance use disorders, which carry the potential for life altering consequences. The likelihood of developing a substance use disorder is greatest for those who begin alcohol or other drug use in their early teens. Prevention and early intervention can help limit experimentation and reduce risky behavior before serious social and health problems develop. Our partners advance innovative screening and early intervention approaches to prevent and reduce youth substance use and promote health and well-being.

  • In 2018, the database will expand to include grantee organizations working on national prevention and early intervention efforts across the U.S.

FA - Families Anonymous— Families Anonymous is a 12-Step fellowship for the families and friends who have known a feeling of desperation concerning the destructive behavior of someone very near to them, whether caused by drugs, alcohol, or related behavioral problems. When you come into our rooms you are no longer alone, but among friends who have experienced similar problems.  Any concerned person is encouraged to attend our meetings, even if there is only a suspicion of a problem.

  • FA meetings that appear in applications with data services from Capacitype originate from national meeting finder and organizational websites that intend to help individuals and families find appropriate recovery support and mutual aid group options in their communities.

Facing Addiction with NCADD - Action Network Partner—The Facing Addiction Action Network is a coalition of organizations that represent diverse areas of interest across the spectrum of substance use and addiction issues. From recovery community organizations to family advocacy groups, prevention and education networks, public health agencies, labor partners, faith leaders, and many more, Action Network members stand in support of the Facing Addiction Advocacy & Action Agenda. It is through the strength of these tremendous partners that Facing Addiction will execute our agenda and promote real solutions to the addiction crisis.

  • Data set is updated quarterly with initial publication in March 2017.

Facing Addiction with NCADD - Affiliates—Facing Addiction with NCADD Affiliates have a long and strong legacy - one that focuses on the community and the belief that recovery is possible and desirable.  Today, the councils that make up the Network of Affiliates provide an array of addiction-related services at the local level, including: information and referrals; public awareness campaigns; prevention and education programs in schools, communities and workplaces; intervention and treatment services; and advocacy on behalf of people affected by the disease of alcoholism/addiction and their families.

  • Data set is updated quarterly with initial publication in July 2018.

GRASP - Grief Recovery After Substance Passing— Grief Recovery After Substance Passing (GRASP) was created to offer understanding, compassion, and support for those who have lost someone they love through addiction and overdose.

  • GRASP meetings that appear in applications with data services from Capacitype originate from national meeting finder and organizational websites that intend to help individuals and families find appropriate recovery support and mutual aid group options in their communities.

LegitScript Certified—LegitScript's Addiction Treatment Certification ensures that providers of drug and alcohol addiction treatment services, including in-patient addiction treatment, mutual support groups, and crisis hotlines, are in compliance with applicable laws and regulations. You can learn more about the certification program for addiction treatment resources by selecting this page

  • Data set is updated quarterly with initial publication in August 2018.

LifeRing Secular Recovery— LifeRing Secular Recovery is an abstinence-based, worldwide network of individuals seeking to live in recovery from addiction to alcohol or to other non-medically indicated drugs. In LifeRing, we offer each other peer-to-peer support in ways that encourage personal growth and continued learning through personal empowerment. Our approach is based on developing, refining, and sharing our own personal strategies for continued abstinence and crafting a rewarding life in recovery. In short, we are sober, secular, and self-directed.

  • LifeRing meetings that appear in applications with data services from Capacitype originate from national meeting finder and organizational websites that intend to help individuals and families find appropriate recovery support and mutual aid group options in their communities.

MEPP Washoe County—The Mathewson Early Prevention Program (MEPP) is an initiative of Transforming Youth Recovery (TYR) that aims to support a comprehensive substance misuse prevention and wellness system for youth and families in Washoe County, Northern Nevada. TYR is contributing to the capacity-building effort in which providers, educators, families, and engaged community members are working collaboratively to gain knowledge on effective implementation strategies and practices for substance misuse prevention.

NA - Narcotics Anonymous— NA is a nonprofit fellowship or society of men and women for whom drugs had become a major problem. We are recovering addicts who meet regularly to help each other stay clean. This is a program of complete abstinence from all drugs. There is only one requirement for membership, the desire to stop using. We suggest that you keep an open mind and give yourself a break. Our program is a set of principles written so simply that we can follow them in our daily lives. The most important thing about them is that they work.

  • NA meetings that appear in applications with data services from Capacitype originate from national meeting finder and organizational websites that intend to help individuals and families find appropriate recovery support and mutual aid group options in their communities.

Nar-Anon Family Groups— The Nar-Anon Family Groups is primarily for those who know or have known a feeling of desperation concerning the addiction problem of someone very near to you. We have traveled that unhappy road too, and found the answer with serenity and peace of mind. When you come into the family group, you are no longer alone, but among true friends who understand your problem as few others could. We respect your confidence and anonymity as we know you will respect ours. We hope to give you the assurance that no situation is too difficult and no unhappiness is too great to be overcome.

  • Nar-Anon meetings that appear in applications with data services from Capacitype originate from national meeting finder and organizational websites that intend to help individuals and families find appropriate recovery support and mutual aid group options in their communities.

NARR, National Alliance for Recovery Residences—The National Alliance for Recovery Residences directly supports persons in recovery from addiction by improving their access to quality recovery residences through standards, support services, placement, education, research, and advocacy. NARR currently serves 25 regional affiliate organizations who collectively support over 25,000 persons in addiction recovery and are living in over 2,500 certified recovery residences throughout the United States.

  • NARR residences that appear in Capacitype have been submitted by the general public, indicate membership on their public website, and are tagged for search purposes.  

NATSAP, National Association of Therapeutic Schools and Programs—The National Association of Therapeutic Schools and Programs membership includes therapeutic schools, residential treatment programs, wilderness programs, outdoor therapeutic programs, young adult programs, and home-based residential programs working with troubled teens and troubled adolescents. All are working through NATSAP to ensure the highest quality services to the young people and families they serve.

  • Data set from NATSAP membership directory last updated July 3, 2018 (U.S. and Canada).

MM - Moderation Management— Moderation Management (MM) is a behavioral change program and national support group network for people concerned about their drinking and who desire to make positive lifestyle changes. MM empowers individuals to accept personal responsibility for choosing and maintaining their own path, whether moderation or abstinence. MM promotes early self-recognition of risky drinking behavior, when moderate drinking is a more easily achievable goal. MM is run by lay members who came to the organization to resolve personal issues and stayed to help others.

  • MM meetings that appear in applications with data services from Capacitype originate from national meeting finder and organizational websites that intend to help individuals and families find appropriate recovery support and mutual aid group options in their communities.

Oxford House—In its simplest form, an Oxford House describes a democratically run, self-supporting, and drug free home. The number of residents in a House may range from six to fifteen; there are houses for men, houses for women, and houses that accept women with children. Each House represents a remarkably effective and low cost method of preventing relapse. This was the purpose of the first Oxford House established in 1975, and this purpose is served, day by day, house after house, in each of over 2,000 houses in the United States today.

  • Oxford Houses that appear in Capacitype have been submitted by the general public, indicate membership on their public website, and are tagged for search purposes. 

Recovery Friendly Workplace—Recovery Friendly Workplaces (RFW's) support their communities by recognizing recovery from substance use disorder as a strength and by being willing to hire and work intentionally with people in recovery. Each certified workplace encourages an environment where employers, employees, and communities can collaborate to create positive change and eliminate barriers for those impacted by addiction.

  • Data set last updated April 1, 2018.

SAMHSA, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration—The treatment resources in the application were retrieved from SAMHSA’s Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator. This is a confidential and anonymous source of information for persons seeking treatment facilities in the United States or U.S. Territories for substance abuse/addiction and/or mental health problems. 

  • A preliminary data set of resources for substance abuse and addiction treatment is retrieved from the Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator which is managed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Agency (SAMHSA) Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (CBHSQ). SAMHSA endeavors to keep the Locator current. All information in the Locator is updated annually from facility responses to SAMHSA's National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS) and National Mental Health Services Survey (N-MHSS). Data set last updated November 27, 2017
  • In an effort to better assist people in finding and accessing quality treatment care, the data set of treatment resources has been reviewed by the Data Team for accuracy of contact information and self-reporting of Licenses, Certifications, and Accreditations (LCAs). Treatment resources that have a SAMHSA designation alone signal licensure from a State responsible agency. You can learn more about treatment resource licensing and verification by selecting this help page.

SMART Recovery—SMART Recovery is the leading self-empowering addiction recovery support group. Their participants learn tools for addiction recovery based on the latest scientific research and participate in a world-wide community which includes free, self-empowering, science-based mutual help groups. The resources mapped in Capacitype reflect the locations of their daily meetings.

  • Through a Data Partner arrangement, the SMART Recovery meeting data set is published and updated weekly. Import process was initiated in May, 2017.

The Joint Commission—As an independent, not-for-profit organization, The Joint Commission accredits and certifies nearly 21,000 health care organizations and programs in the United States. Joint Commission accreditation and certification is recognized nationwide as a symbol of quality that reflects an organization’s commitment to meeting certain performance standards.

  • In an effort to better assist people in finding and accessing quality treatment care, the data set of treatment resources has been reviewed by the Data Team for accuracy of contact information and self-reporting of Licenses, Certifications, and Accreditations (LCAs). Where applicable, treatment resources that have completed Joint Commission accreditation are indicated. You can learn more about treatment resource verification by selecting this help page

TYR, Transforming Youth Recovery Grantee—In 2013, Transforming Youth Recovery (TYR) initiated funding to study the capacity for colleges and universities in the U.S. to provide students in recovery the support and skills necessary to help them successfully obtain, transition to, or reclaim desired life and academic pursuits. To support this broad effort, TYR has awarded $10,000 early stage grants to institutions of higher education looking to initiate collegiate recovery programs and communities. As a component of the grant, TYR Grantees have been mapping their collegiate recovery programs and the resources in their communities that support students in recovery. Additional collegiate recovery programs are mapped if they are not a grantee but are a member of the Association for Recovery in Higher Education.

WFS - Women for Sobriety— Women for Sobriety (WFS) is an organization whose purpose is to help all women find their individual path to recovery through discovery of self, gained by sharing experiences, hopes and encouragement with other women in similar circumstances. We are an abstinence-based self-help program for women facing issues of alcohol or drug addiction. Our “New Life” Program acknowledges the very special needs women have in recovery – the need to nurture feelings of self-value and self-worth and the desire to discard feelings of guilt, shame, and humiliation.

  • WFS meetings that appear in applications with data services from Capacitype originate from national meeting finder and organizational websites that intend to help individuals and families find appropriate recovery support and mutual aid group options in their communities.

YPR, Young People in Recovery—YPR creates and cultivates local community-led chapters through grassroots organizing and training across the U.S. Chapters and support young people in or seeking recovery by empowering them to obtain stable employment, secure suitable housing, and continue and complete their educations. Chapters also advocate on the local and state levels for better accessibility of these services and other effective recovery resources.

  • YPR Chapters across the U.S. have been reported and tracked by Capacitype since initiation of asset-based studies in 2013. Data set last reviewed in October 1, 2016. 

Additional data sets as of March, 2017

Drug Courts preliminary data set was manually created by the Data Team using information publicly accessible from the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP). Data set was last reviewed on March 26, 2017. 

NADCP receives mapping data from a statewide or territorial problem-solving court coordinator or other designated point of contact in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Treatment Court locations were last updated on December 31, 2014. Those interested in learning more or verifying specific court locations and services, are encouraged to reference the  U.S. Drug Court Map

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